Weeping Willow/Corrina [demo]

[Revised notes and added to this blog on 15th May 2016 after Ian Semple kindly included this recording on his Radio Penwith show. That’s the only Cornish connection, though I expect I’ll continue to sing it now I live down here. NB this replaces the demo I posted on my song site in July 2014. It’s still a demo, but it’s nearer the way I now hear it in my head. Whether it’ll ever get as far as a commercial recording is a different issue.:)]

Not one of my songs, of course. This demo is an interpretation of a song I learned many years ago from Michael Cooney by way of banjo player (well, multi-instrumentalist) Merrion Wood. Oddly enough, Bert Jansch also recorded a slightly similar ‘Weeping Willow Blues’ using a 12-string. I’ve never heard Michael Cooney’s recording, but I seem to remember that he also played it on 12-string when I heard him play it live. Just to be awkward, I play it slide, so it’s probably not that close to either version.:)

I think Michael did tell me at the time (I guess it was in the early 70s) where his version comes from – I heard him sing it at the old Shrewsbury Folk Club. (A post on Mudcat suggests that it came from Leadbelly: it does somehwhat resemble Roberta.) However, he kindly responded to a recent email as follows:

I first heard the song sung by Guy Carawan; I believe he sang it in a minor key. I added a verse or two from other blues songs and worked out that arrangement. I play it in D with the E string tuned down to D, AND I used to (back then) tune the whole guitar down so when I played it in “D” it was really in C# or even C.

Michael recorded the same song on an LP called ‘Singer of Old Songs’, and it turns out that it’s on the CD of the same name he’s released on his own label. I plan to acquire a copy sooner rather than later: apart from being curious to see how far my version has changed from his, I always enjoyed his sets back in the 70s and I look forward to hearing some of those songs again.

The ‘Sometimes I think you’re too sweet to die…’ verse is close to one associated with Rabbit Brown’s ‘James Alley Blues’, widely known through Judy Roderick’s rewrite ‘Born in the Country’.

David Harley
Small Blue-Green World

Engine Inn Open Mic

A great open mic near Wheal Alice, and some music links added.

I took a couple of instruments along to the open mic at the Engine Inn, Cripplesease: last Friday of the month, open mic. 01736-740204. There was a wide range of excellent music, and I enjoyed it very much. (I’m also looking forward to trying the acoustic session every Tuesday in the near future.) Continue reading “Engine Inn Open Mic”

The Last Musketeer [demo]

No Cornish connection as such: it’s just that I’ve started working on this song again since we moved here.

Words & Music by David Harley, copyright 1975

This is one I probably haven’t sung in public since the 1970s, but I’m not sure why. I wrote it after a friend’s wedding in the Isle of Man in the early 70s, though it’s not about that specific event. But I remembered it again while I was arranging accommodation for a completely different and Very Important wedding. 🙂

[6th May 2020: new version recorded for no particular reason: I just wanted to try out a different software package. Still a demo.]

Older version with light overdubbing.

Continue reading “The Last Musketeer [demo]”

The Road to Frenchman’s Creek [demo]

A Cornish (sort of) song…

Demo version of a song that started to take shape while we were house-hunting in Kernow. Not that Show of Hands have anything to fear from me in terms of West-Country-oriented songs. But we were actually taking time out around Helford, and couldn’t resist walking over to Frenchman’s Creek. To be honest, though, it’s no more about that than it is about Ithaca.

Continue reading “The Road to Frenchman’s Creek [demo]”